Jan Cox Talk 0370

Willfully Withhold Comment

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Summary 

#370 * Jul 22, 1988 * – 1:07
Notes by TK

Note: an outline entitled “Willfully Withhold Comment” exists for this tape
Kyroot to :06. 

The power of words cannot be underestimated in the City. The ordinary consc. cannot suspect the extent of the power of words just as the eye cannot see itself. Only a RR can suspect the benefits of the willful suspension of speech. Life needs man to constantly babble; speech is a molecular activity thru man that is essential to Life’s growth. The only commentary a RR would make would be about the totally irrelevant. All external/historic heroes are laconic; the populace even expects them to be so—who could imagine an inanely garrulous Clint Eastwood?

So should it be for the internal hero of the RR: silent. It is the molecular activity of sound/speech that is of value and meaning–there is no ‘content’ conveyed; it is null and void as such. There is however, a small necessity in Life for some nervous systems to operate in an opposite fashion: to willfully withhold speech. Note the widely held knowledge of the difficulty of expressing ’emotions/feelings’ in words. At Life’s level this is true as well and it is part of man’s function to attempt to express verbally such energy transaction in Life’s greater body.

There is a whole section of man’s NS devoted exclusively to this task. It is this section that the RR must functionally deactivate. In man the YC is in the position of having to continually comment/participate in energies foreign to its purview, and it is very unsatisfying. Notice that the only valid meat of ordinary conversation is talk of: health, money, age or a general criticism of life. The withholding of comment is a power. 

Reputations are born in times of chaos, crises, calamity or at least great stress. Everybody in the City must have/seek to establish a reputation—a fairly stable ‘I’—which is then considered by the ordinary when it is of some extent (garnering attention from a wider audience) to be valuable in its own right: conferring increased benefit. Stage-fright is merely a sensitivity to the real impact of the energy of attention-to-you energy transfer. The RR has got to establish a real internal reputation thru his facing/grappling with the everyday store of chaos that is his ordinary life/problems.

And Kyroot Said…

The more the Yellow Circuits seem to perceive themselves,
the more dense, obtuse, and impractical becomes the ball of info.

***

A prime cause of City suffering: Attempting to bronze the
ephemeral.

***

History, sad to say, never captures ALL of reality… well,
hell, REALITY never captures all of reality.

***

Most poetry in the City seems to be just to make People
happier about misery, and more dependent on death.

***

Far beyond what Men SAY they feel is what they ACTUALLY
feel.

***

If you just read about what everybody else has thought
about, it’s real hard to tell just what’s going on.

***

Never bring on the elephants just before the tumblers.

***

His opinions are Life’s opinions. Likewise for his
adversities, and likewise for theirs.

***

For Revolutionary purposes, a theoretical explanation is no
explanation at all.

***

Heard this one City bigwig declare, “Individuality is MUCH
overrated, except in my case.”

***

Those who seriously and serenely say, “My fate is in your
hands,” have none.

***
To a Real Revolutionist science is humorous; I don’t mean
that he laughs at it, it’s just that all apparent human
“discoveries” are funny.

***

If there was actually anything special about the past, the
nineteen fifties wouldn’t have ended so soon.

***

Will you be real, real surprised to discover that god’s name
is Stanley?, like in Stanley Power Tools.

***

And where does dust go when it dies?

***

My kinda really aggressive intellectual is one to whom
reading is a full contact sport.

***

From a certain view, City knowledge is derived from taking
3-D stuff apart, and Revolutionist data comes from putting it
back together under 4-D conditions and light.

***

What could be more a sign of a truly civilized City Person
than that they purchase the useless with borrowed money.

***

A reminder: Those who can, do, and those who can’t, don’t,
and only those who know the difference know that there IS no
difference.

***

Although many a voice has declared their interest in the
actual “workings of the play,” only a Revolutionist has any
business ever going backstage.

***

Heard another scared, but perhaps socially aware, City
sorehead sneer, “Life is just like an ice cream sundae, all the
nuts end up on top.” (And not too shabby a shot, thought I, and
thank god bananas can’t vote, or bear arms.)

***
Never trust a god who demands to be noticed.

***

There’s hardly any reasonably priced way to comfort the
ordinary.

***

City folks seem hellbent on taking the confusion in others
for “depth of character.”

***

Ordinary history is no more than a disguised belief in the
dead.

***

In the midst of a reminisce fit, one ole City-timer said,
“You know, I really got more memories than I care for.”

***

Beware, the foot lockers of the mind.

***

City father once told his half-flaked son, “You shouldn’t
think of more than one thing at a time, and sometimes even THAT’s
too much.”

***

If your aim is to just be ordinary, you’ll probably succeed.

***

In a certain way, the Revolutionist looks upon himself as a
foreign land, and later perhaps, even as a Crown colony as he
sings, “Oh, Empire of mine, we are the grapes, us are the wine.”

***


Transcript

WILLFULLY WITHHOLD COMMENT

Copyright (c) Jan M. Cox, 1988
Document: 370, GSIBM, July 22, 1988
7/22/88

There is no way to overestimate the power and necessity of words in ordinary life. Don’t assume this is obvious, because it isn’t. In fact, consciousness cannot recognize it. Words have a power in the City that is not recognized any more than the eye can see itself, or ordinary consciousness can perceive itself. The importance of words cannot be comprehended in the same way that the mind cannot perceive its own limits: the limits are what make it able to function.

To put it another way: Only a Real Revolutionist can suspect the possibility of and the possibilities in the cessation of unnecessary talk. More specifically, I have told you that it should be your own iron clad rule to never talk about money, or your problems, or your health or age. When I mention these it strikes your nervous system in a way that makes you want to almost giggle. Why? The nervous system knows that there is an authority, a power, to withholding comments; a power unknown in ordinary life.

Throughout history small parts of Life’s body have attempted to be involved in weak reflections of this phenomenon: in religious retreats or monasteries where there were rules of silence. Here’s a small tributary that’s so funny it’s not funny. Sometimes people band together under a specific religious banner and someone says, “What we should do is not talk.” Of course, as soon as they decide not to talk, they begin to write about why they won’t talk. They need to defend their position, to comment on it. Within just a few years or a decade you have serious defenders of the faith; in their own mute way they will attempt to become evangelists; attempting to recruit others by, in some way, telling them the benefits of not talking.

Things are arranged so that Man comments on everything. It’s not an illness, and I’m not attacking mechanical loose talk across the board. It’s as necessary as breathing. Not only are people driven to comment, but the sensation is wired into man that if he does not comment on what’s taking place, especially problems, they’ll get worse. If babble were to cease on a large scale, the growth of Life would be stunted. This should not surprise any of you — you know how hard it is for you to refrain from continual comment on anything and everything.

This is especially the case with apparent “problems;” it is almost impossible to withhold comment on that which you find distasteful or stressful. And the compulsion to speak of one’s problems is also verbally explained (this is not some psychological problem or character flaw; it’s the very design of the nervous system): “I came to this talk show today to tell you about my horrible childhood in the hopes that it will help others.” But the Real Revolutionist begins to feel the benefits of willfully withholding comment. There are times when you find yourself talking about your problems, even if it’s only about the high cost of living said to a stranger on the check-out line, and the sensation you have is that you want to shave your tongue. You know I’m not telling you to become mute. Obviously you still need to occasionally make comments, but they should be on anything in the world that is absolutely of no consequence.

Life requires that everyone comment on everything: it’s almost impossible to refrain from it. Life on the whole must have these continual comments. Talk is the vehicle through which energy is transferred in a fashion singular to man. It is a vital molecular activity needed by Life, as important as procreation, as important as breathing. Without talk, the human race would die, insofar as the purpose its serving.

Yet a few suspect the real power that might be gained from willfully withholding comment. This small segment of the population willfully withdraw. Do you not find it interesting that what history remembers as heroes were people who spoke very, very little? Can you imagine a hero who was a blabbermouth? A hero is someone in history, or in your nervous system, known to have authority; someone you’d take as a leader; someone with whom you’d dance backward. And they’re always people of few words.

History recounts something else in this regard: it recounts that there are those who claim that the masses engage in useless conversation. What was the curse for offending the gods in the Old Testament? It was the tower of Babel: everyone began babbling and they couldn’t understand one another. It didn’t say that the people spoke different languages, but that they couldn’t understand one another. Does that sound like anything new? It is not that uncommon for social critics, or different parts of Life’s body, to decry excessive talk and the lack of discussion on serious issues. (Of course, important issues are whatever’s important to them.) Life always has some criticism of itself, but it’s on a very small scale.

The larger segment of humanity is certainly in no way driven to cease talking so much. People say, “We’ve got to quit fighting so much, eating so much, dying so much.” But no group in its collective wisdom proclaimed, “We talk too much.” Because people do not talk too much. The energy can and must be transferred through human speech. Although critics think that much of the talk is of no value, the content is irrelevant: the sound waves are of value. The transfer of energy is the ultimate value.

Life is always doing a non-hostile burlesque of itself. People are driven to believe and say what Life should be about; in this case, that the content of human speech is supremely important — and then you have what is actually happening: Energy transferred through sound. People could just never buy that; they’re not supposed to. Man must believe he’s conveying specific information; that’s true, but the basis of the transfer is not the content but talk itself. If content were important, assuming Life is trying to operate at maximum speed, everyone would be discussing philosophy and particle physics. If that was necessary for most efficient growth, it would be happening, but it’s not. How many people are discussing serious matters like, “What might be the nature of Life,” right here in this advanced western culture? Life doesn’t need people to discuss serious matters; it just makes everyone believe that it does.

Chew on this: Throughout history, people have always commented on the difficulty of expressing exactly what one feels, of putting human emotions into words. From the ancient Greeks to current avant garde poetry this phenomenon is mentioned. What ordinary consciousness cannot grasp is the larger dynamic occurring within Life itself — there are some parts of Life’s feelings that Life cannot adequately put into words which is, I suggest to you, one reason why Life has humanity attempting it. You are working on it for Life. Any phenomenon, problem, situation that seems unique to man is not: it occurs within some larger reality in Life’s body. This is not meant as some cheap anthropomorphism such as, “Life has trouble expressing its emotions,” — that’s not right or wrong; it’s just not applicable to describe something beyond the 3-D world. If men have a problem, a situation, it also exists on a greater level that is ultimately specious to verbalize in human language, but that situation does exist on a larger scale in Life. So, for lack of a different/dimensional language I’ll say that Life itself cannot express what it feels in a satisfactory way.

There is a specific molecular reason involved with the way Life is growing: it has driven man faithfully to sing, whine, pine, poeticize over that fact that he can’t express what he feels. Does that stop anyone? Nay, nay.

If the Yellow Circuit operated in the way in which the Yellow Circuit says it should operate, it would find it to be unbearable, unprogrammable, and unacceptable that not only is it made to comment upon each and every thing that runs through its system, but also that the comment in no way “reflects anything of any importance to me.”

Consider the areas people comment on under ordinary conditions. First, I would suggest, health. I’ve already told you that a Real Revolutionist has no business thinking about or discussing his health. If you’re sick, get treated; there’s nothing more to discuss. Talking about age is just another form of discussing health, and you should note how much age pops up in ordinary conversation. Running a close second is: money. If you refrained from commenting on the state of your health, finances, money in general, and your age, what would be left? Oh, how could I forget — just the general criticism of life. You can criticize politics, sports, and anything else you take notice of. If you dropped the criticism of life along with health, money and age, then what conversation could occur among people in general? Only a few people can appreciate the potential benefit of seriously considering this matter. Fewer still can begin to fully feel for themselves the real power inherent in the willful withholding of continual comments. It is not passive; it is an active withdrawal, and it is a secret, singular power. Inside of you are 80,000 people, as if they’re at the super bowl, screaming, commenting, criticizing — saying some very witty and piercing comments — and you don’t say one word. Or, you may say, regardless of the topic under discussion, “I couldn’t agree more.” Regardless of what your voices are saying, you are in charge.

Let’s segue into this: Real reputations are made during times of great calamity. In the City, everyone has to have a reputation. The nervous systems knows it’s incomplete; everyone knows they itch, that they’re dissatisfied. One of the ways it comes out is in the form of hero worship. All gossip is a form of hero worship. Note, by the way, how intrigued people are especially with the dead, or those out of reach. If things weren’t that way, we wouldn’t have history or biographies. As I said, everyone in the City has to have a reputation or you wouldn’t have the word, “I.” In a sense, everyone is attempting to establish one; at the minimal level this reputation is what appears to be a fairly stable “I”: “Yes, I’m Fred.”

People feel that if they had a reputation it would be of great benefit. This feeling is not psychological; it is built into the nervous system. So, what is a reputation? It’s a guarantee that other nervous systems will give you attention. A reputation means getting attention, not just from your mate and a friend or two, but from a broad spectrum of people. Getting attention is very, very real: Certain people practically throw up or faint if they have to address a crowd. Why? Because attention is real, not magic. It is a transfer of energy.

Back to where I started. Real reputations are made during times of great calamity; times of crisis, chaos and great stress. That’s true of all the great heroic figures in history. Whoever became famous for being the ultimate chill out? The greater the reputation, the greater was the calamity. That is an external pointing, what about internally? In order to achieve an unnatural, new stability requires the development of a non-verbal, private reputation within you. And its got to be real. It is built in the same way that reputations are built externally: history will remember that one man or woman who, in the midst of an erupting volcano, risked his or her life to save all the trapped children. The one who arose, in the heat of battle, and cried, “We will not retreat. Follow me,” is the one who is remembered.

Great reputations don’t come to those who don’t do anything. They come to those who brave crises and chaos. Surely you know that you don’t have to look for calamities and stress outside of yourself. If you’re breathing, if your nervous system is operational, you’ve got all the pressure, chaos and opportunity you need. People in the City always talk about wanting to avoid stressful situations, but the only way people could not have problems is to not have a nervous system (And that would be a real problem!). Chaos is in your nervous system all the time; you needn’t do anything to stir it up. I’m talking about run of the mill energy flowing through every human nervous system. If you’re going to make a reputation, that is the place to make it.