Jan Cox Talk 0584

Don’t “Self-Plagiarize” by Thinking the Same Thing Twice

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Audio Download = DOWNLOAD Jan Cox Talk 0584 from Cassette
AKS/News Item Gallery = jcap 1989-07-19 (0584)
Condensed AKS/News Items =See Below
Summary = See Below
Excursion / Task = See Below 
Diagrams = 
Transcript = None




Summary

#584 Dec 15, 1989 – 1:06
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :08. There are activities that are disclaimed, denounced, even prohibited by Life at the individual level but not at a more general one. E.g., murder. There is a restriction/control on murder at a general level, but not an absolute prohibition. Virtually nothing prohibited at the individual level is so prohibited at the general level. This Thing info is controlled (interpreted) via religion—diluted, a midway position between disclaiming and absolute prohibition; it is a controlled discouragement.

The Real Revolutionist should absolutely cherish any opportunities where he can exercise some personal freedom from the general demands made by life upon men. Life insists on a particular freedom for its own growth. The freest areas are where Life grows. When New Info arises in you, this is the closest thing to real freedom. Do not “self plagiarize”—self cannibalize from previous creations—think the same thing over again.

Consider the reversal: whereas the prohibited at the individual level is acceptable at the general, in This Thing the prohibited at the general level is acceptable at the individual level…within limits.

How can you not cherish freedom’? The human race is not wired up to cherish freedom.

Excursion

For NP : if there were a “method” to This Thing one would be: the continual checking with yourself to see if “Am I at this moment thinking more than I have to?”


And Kyroot Said…

A certain young Viscount viscerally exclaimed, “I cannot be
intellectually bribed.” And his sidecar cerebellum thought, “So?
Who’d pay to be robbed?”

***

The more you’re entangled with the general requirements of
life, the less time you have to see to your own specific
potential.

***

One fellow not too far from here, in fact, used to love to
sing out, “I’m singing in the rain, just singing in the rain,”
even when it wasn’t raining. And to counteract this factual
imbalance, sometimes when he’d be singing, “I’m singing in the
rain…,” he wouldn’t actually be singing. (In certain ways, a
more limited area such as a three dimensional world, is easier
to keep tidy.)

***

Whilst perusing and otherwise reading a flashy article, this
guy came across the following comment, to wit: “Certain
fictional characters have almost taken on a life of their own.”
And he snorted, “Big deal, I almost have too.”

***

There is “a” future, and “the” future, and where the latter
prevails, the former is not present.

***

The theme song of this one planet seemed to be, “It’s Never
Too Soon To Say You’re Sorry,” until all of their brothers came
for a visit and then it became, “Hey, Who Left The Door Open?”

***

One fellow said, “If I could do in public what I think in
private, I would be perceived as truly outstanding.” And his
wifely voice thought, “If you think in private what you say you
can in public, you would be truly outstanding.”

***

You remember that particular zone I’ve mentioned before that
sometimes runs in parallel with yours and sometimes doesn’t?
Well, dig this. Number one this week on their best seller list
is a book entitled, “New Hope For The Past.”

***
During flurries of existential-economic excitement, this one
suit person would ofttimes call out, “Double digits is what we’re
talking here, double digits.” Til one day, another voice slyly
noted, “No large deal, double digits is the minimal you can talk
about anyway.” (He started to say to himself, “Think about it,”
then realized he didn’t have to.)

***

This one little wet person just about wrapped it up for many
of the creatures of his world when he noted, “Hey, I’ve
forgotten more than I’ll ever know.”

***

You’ve heard the admonition, “Don’t make the same mistake
twice,” and you’ve heard my caveat, “Don’t repeat yourself.”
Now, let me tell you — if you do the latter, you’ve done the
former.

***

This is probably as opportune a time as any to clear up one
matter for good, to wit, note: There are two kinds of humor —
funny humor, and that which ain’t.

***

Over in one of our semi-parallel, in-law solar systems, I
recently overheard a guy vociferously complaining about how
“prejudiced” life was toward him and I also heard another voice
respond, “Normally you think of someone being singled out and
scorned because of their variation from the prevailing majority
and norm, but you — you appear to be just as common and everyday
as possible.” And the guy says, “I know, that’s just what I’m
talking about.”

***

His dreams of death were described by a certain hombre
thusly: He sez it was like going into a deep sleep, but when he
first awoke he couldn’t tell if he was in a place of favor, or
punishment. But after a short walk around, there was no longer
any doubt as to where he was when he saw St. Francis in a new
pair of golden sandals and a Laker’s jacket.
***

In sending his son off to the wars, a father gave his final
advice, “Don’t worry so much about getting a communicable
disease, be concerned more about becoming one.”

***

Over their aperitifs Plato mused, “It’s hard to be original
in your own home town,” to which Mendelssohn added, “Palaces
built on landfills will always smell of garbage.” And the Greek
said, “That’s what I meant.”

***

An old wise man (he was actually more verbose than wise, but
at certain stages in a wise man’s career it’s hard to tell the
difference, well, at any rate) early one morning gathered a group
of youngsters and said he had an important story to tell them as
their initial “grown-up” lesson.” And after they had settled
down he began, “There was once a man who liked to think, and do
other interesting things alone. So he decided he would begin to
arise an hour earlier each morning so as to have more free time
for himself. But soon this just became another part of his
unnoticed daily routine, and so to give himself some fresh
impetus he moved his wake up time up another hour earlier, but
quite soon this too was just another creature in his zoo of
habit. So then, after much careful thought and deliberation, do
you know what the man decided to do?” And after it became
obvious that none of his little listeners could conceive of the
proper response, the old man said, “Well, settle down again, and
I’ll tell you what he did. Every day, for the rest of his life,
he set his alarm to go off one minute earlier than it did the
morning before.” And the tykes were so smitten by the
implications of the tale that several had milk, while the rest
wet their pants.

***

In a circumstantial world, it’s hard to prove anything
conclusively.

***

A hobby involved with talk is not much of a hobby.

***

One inner-ballistic explorer has as his personal, secret
epigrammatic exhortation, “Ah, the exhilarating thrill of
accelerating contradictions.”

***