Jan Cox Talk 3001

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Jan’s Daily Fresh Real News (to accompany this talk)

ONLY THE PRIVATE MINDED GET IT
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Home Delivery To The Few — Since Fourteen Hundred And Sixty Two *
June 6, 2003 © 2003: JAN COX



After decades of a reign that included many triumphs, and some set backs:
great progress and public joy mixed with private sadness and personal uncertainty,
the monarch was sitting by an open window upstairs in the castle,
gazing across the warm summer conditions, out toward the surrounding forest,
and said to his trusted dog:
“The squirrels know more than they’re telling.”



A father said to a son:
“In my desire to help you find your way with a minimum of routine headaches,
and a maximum of non standard head pleasures,
let me tell you that it is alright to feel at times, miffed with life,
but the trick is to never let anyone know.”



One man began to have SO much fun looking out the window on the journey that he finally had the thought: “I believe I’ll just get off the next time the train stops,”
and the train immediately decided to quit stopping.
Moral: Trains may not be your friend — but at least they’re theirs.



And in response (to apparently EVERYTHING) one man said:
“I am appalled! — simply appalled!”
Note: simple appellation could serve usefully if applied to
the seeming complexity of life that the mind stirs up.
“The faster the train seems to go,
the harder it is for me to make sense of the scenes passing by the window!”
The ordinary are confounded by what they do not understand;
a man struggling to see what is really going on,
by the mind’s inherent belief that it can understand.

The certain man does not waste energy:
never shoot an intruder in your residence until you can hit him.

Useful Guide To City Success.
If you don’t know what you’re talking about — assume a title;
if you don’t know what you’re doing — assume power;
thus will urban equity continue to prevail in that society will have both.



And from an origins-unknown, sports dictionary found by the side of the main road
coming out of the city comes this entry:
“The Man Who Knows: someone who won’t verbally shoot straight
with the others on the pistol team,”
and a beaver noted to his brother:
“Anyone who would tell a secret to a squirrel (or any other foreigner) is unpatriotic —
why half the animals here don’t belong here!” he concluded —
which brings up a new query: “Why are beavers in the city? —
what do they possibly have to do there?!” — ahhhh! — think about it!



The way man’s intangible reality works
is by men continuing to do things that don’t work,
(more accurately is to say):
men continue thinking and talking about things that don’t work,
and which serve no purpose.


“Today’s lesson,” said the professor,
“Is that size and strength correlate to verbosity — to twaddle, prattle and jabber,
such as in the fact that maggots are noisier than elephants,” and a student interrupted: ”But maggots make no sound,” and the professor replied:
“Even so — who has the last laugh!”
Based on their looks of confusion, he continued:
“Okay class, it’s like this:
for all creatures, there are two states possible:
there is silence, and there is a refraining-from-noisiness:
the first one is the natural state for some,
the other a totally unnatural state for all of those not in the first group, and this is a quite exclusive club — in fact consisting of but a single species: the man-who-knows.”


This one chap would cheer-lead and encourage himself with the constant exhortation: “Go figure!” —
he continued to do it long after he could no longer figure out what it meant.


Religious News.
Those who don’t understand life tend to talk about god.


This letter into Mr. Obvious:
“Dear Mr.: If knowledge doesn’t mean much,
then does ignorance count for anything?
Awaiting your enlightened reply, I remain Yours Sincerely,” etc —
an inquiry obviously in need of no response.



In the city — in the herd-of-humanity — at every moment — someone is always right, (for all the good it does their understanding).
Question: how comes that commonly used bit of sarcasm:

“For all the good this-or-that does” to contain the word, good, and yet be sarcastic? Ummm! — think about it!

While a few of ’em were sittin’ around goofin’ and gabbin’
one god said he thought the best thing about their gig was that
you have no one to look up to —
and after maybe, half a minute had passed, another one spoke up and said
he found that to be the worst part.


Unnoted Fact About Knowing.
What the awakened man knows about one thing — he knows about all things.


Question: What sort of person might seem indifferent to the goings on in
man’s intangible world?
Answer: A person who grasps it.


Conversation Number Seventy.
“A crazy man doesn’t need drugs!”
“Nor one who has recaptured the original silence-of-the-garden.”

One man’s perceived version of how it progresses:
“You go from looking to adults to tell you what is going on,
to seeing others as idiots,
to ridiculing them,
to having no interest in what other people have to tell.”


Fact of City Life.
The grimier the prize — the glitzier must be the contest.
(Suggestion: never give a beaver a gun.)

J

*Home for them is where the head is………………well — used to be.