Jan Cox Talk 3247

Instead of Physically Sleeping in Daytime, People Daydream

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Summary

1/7/05:
Notes by TK

When humans are not engaged in instinctual behavior they share with animals, they do what? Daydream. Humans are not programmed to sleep as animals do when inactive. The foundation of daydreams is feeling: feeling about likes and dislikes. Daydreams give pleasure to the nervous system and w/o affect there is no pleasure. Likes/dislikes are reactions vis a vis the mental world and ergo beliefs rather than knowledge.

Knowledge is based on action in regard to the physical world. Daydreaming is not thinking; mentation re: the physical world is thinking. Consciousness cannot daydream and be aware of itself simultaneously; i.e., it cannot be attempting to awaken. Thinking requires effort and gives no pleasure comparable to daydreaming. (42:49) #3247

Jan’s Daily Fresh Real News (to accompany this talk)

IT TAKES TWO TONGUES TO TANGO
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Non Standard Instructions For The Solo Dancer
JANUARY 7, 2005 © 2005: JAN COX

Said a father to a son:
“Let me point out another feature of that area of interest to us, that of:
consciousness, man’s second, inner reality, and the nature of wanting-to-awaken:
not only did consciousness make up all the stories that collectively constitute man’s cultural, spiritual and intellectual-philosophical reality, but afterwards it began to criticize aspects of the tales even as it continues to create more.
Like decrying the swamping of your boat as you stand pissing therein.”

Just before each battle, one warrior chief would retire alone to his tent,
stare intently at his forehead in a mirror and intone:
“Oh ye most fearful implement of destruction.”
(Back in the city he has a poet brother who performs a similar ritual
[but with slightly different words.])
The characteristics of human consciousness which humans can attribute to consciousness are limited in number only by the confines of human consciousness,
(of which there are none.)
“Oh ye most singular of instruments!”

One man always takes other people with him everywhere he goes –
and yes, for the obvious reason: So that he will never be alone.
That was simple enough – but what is good for pack animals can be stunting for
a would-be lone-wolf-human interested in solving the great mystery:
“What all do my hormones do to my neurons & why is it so difficult to acknowledge it?”

One man says he feels fully justified in his stupidity.
And another chap says that what the world needs is more people telling it
what it needs.
And yet another guy tried jumping-off-the-deep-end, but says it keeps moving on him. (He asks if you had noticed this, but we told him that you were much too busy to be bothered by such meaningless matters.)

Show Biz Tip Applicable For Everyone.
Being introduced as a: “hilarious comedian” can certainly come in handy
if you’re a none-too-funny comedian.

Puzzles one voter: “What eludes me is how everything has always
become worse under the incumbent office holder in all the areas of interest to his political challenger, yet I can’t find how to apply this to the situation regarding my own primary slate of thoughts and alternative possibilities — I guess in other words:
Why can’t I vote my mental me out of office?!”

When you don’t know what you’re talking about you can say anything and make it sound significant (at least to others who don’t know what they’re talking about).

Men who proclaim they have adopted principles which guide-their-life
are for sure in need of guidance.
You either understand how to live or you don’t, and most humans have a consciousness which tells them that on their own, they don’t.

How Things Clearly Go In The City (Even Though Never Noted)
As Covered In A Short Dialogue.
“ ‘For small errors, whole plays they dismiss.’ Now tell me: who said that?”
“What playwright, you mean.”

Confides the mayor of one city:
”My plan is to raise my salary and simultaneously decrease the people’s
expectations of me in such a smooth seamless fashion that they will either
not realize what has occurred or else won’t be bothered by it.
It’s good to control consciousness!”

A Medical Matter Bleeds Over Into A Less Physical Area.
While touring a medical facility, a man who’d devoted his life to achieving satori
was troubled by a question:
“Why do the characteristics of Enlightenment instantly and dramatically increase
in a man when he goes into a coma?”

Hormones send out messages that neurons can sometimes but scarcely comprehend; not a totally new observation, but one whose ramifications have yet to be
fully appreciated.

Words Make It To The Woods.
A spokesman for the squirrels now says that crows are responsible for
the slanderous claim that they are rodents.

The primary reason men engage in conversation is so they’ll have a permissible excuse to talk out loud,
(people enjoy this more than merely doing so in their head — as you well know).

After the king and his terrifying army had crossed the border into the neighboring land, he announced to the frightened people: “My quarrel is not with you,
but with the weather that comes to us from your direction.”
The Winds Make It Into A Man’s Mouth.

And one man says (as hard as it is to believe) he is madder now than before.

The speaker climaxed his remarks thus: “Once you allow even one exception,
then all exceptions become permissible,” and from the audience a voice shouted back, “Making exceptions just that much more lovable.”

Power to all is power to none. (And a king insists that None is his well known nickname.)

Once, a long, long time ago, lived a man who didn’t-know-what-to-think – so he didn’t. (Humanity as a whole has made much progress since then.)

In the latest appearance of the ever popular Talking Twins, Number One said:
“All famous people are severe disappointments in their private lives,”
“Yeah,” added Number Two, “that’s why they become famous in the first place.”
(And Number One nodded his agreement.)

An ole timer told the kid: “If you ain’t got the kind of smarts that periodically
remind you of just how dumb you are, your smarts are seriously deficient.”

Health Check You Can Do At Home.
If one thing seems to come after another – you’re still alive.

Fleas will abandon a dying elephant (which is why pachyderms aren’t required to carry life preservers).

A man with a serious illness requiring continual treatment one day thought:
“I suffer more from having to go take treatments than I do from the illness –
what’s wrong with this picture?! — (if anything).”
You can’t keep a good man down — unless you get him embroiled in defining what “good” means.

Conversation.
“Not knowing what time it is won’t keep you from being late.”
“Yes it will.”
“Are you sure?”
“Have I lied to you lately!?”
“I don’t know – is it two o’clock yet?”

Though human history has greatly distorted the story:
in one creation, back when things were just beginning to grow and go well,
The Tower Of Babel was the name they gave their central feeding station.
(“Would I lie to you?”
“Do you talk to me?”
Quick! – was the above a dialogue between two people,
or two areas of one man’s mind?)
“I’m not sure – can I just guess?”
Yes – and you will be correct.
“But how do you know that before you hear which one I choose?”
Because you can’t lie-to-me.
“Hey-y-y, wait a minute! – is this me talking to me again?
Ah jeeze! – how many times am I gonna fall for that!”
(And one man says he still feels fully justified in his stupidity.)
Though kept completely secret from man: the true name of everyone’s city is:
Where ELSE Are You Going To Go!
(Which does not play out the same to those privy to such secrets.)

“For some reason,” thought a man, “fleas are never as enjoyable to the second owner.”
Men invented books to manage the dangerous surplus of trees.

To his self a man mused: “Well, even being mistaken in your thinking at least shows that you’re thinking…..doesn’t it?!?”
(A few men never feel justified in their stupidity.
“Well since that’s not necessary, I’d say that’s stupid of them. That’s what I’d say.”)

You may safely assume that you’re in trouble if at the playoffs of
the Metaphysical Games you’re specifically asked to wear a face mask.
(“There more things dreamt of in my nightmares, Hortense,
than I can e’er relate, when back in my waking dream state.”)
What would occur to a silo of corn if one kernel suddenly conceived of
the entire scene?
“Pa pa: is the reality of being enlightened anything like the numerous descriptions
men have given of it?”
“You are aware that only an unenlightened person would ask that question?”
“I need to focus on the one kernel, right!?”
“More precisely on the fact that you is it — and it’s all you have.”

A farmer in a nearby field stopped his toil to ponder:
“If a preponderance of fear can produce a bounty of caution,
why do we not reap more from our ever abundant crops of ignorance?”

Nothing can deliver what it promises –
that’s why it has to promise something in the first place.
(“Pater dear: is not consciousness the one exception to that?!”
“OUR kind of consciousness, yes.”)

In an apparent attempt to reflect on thought’s place in the overall
scheme of human affairs one fellow says:
“’Tis only if I take conscious notice of what I’m thinking that real trouble begins.”

One man lost all faith in medical science when he heard its institutional statement that: “Being cold doesn’t cause colds.” “Oh no?” he retorts,
“Just look at what being stupid does to our stupidity!”

On one world, all of the religions grew out of failed vaudeville acts.
(“And that world wouldn’t perchance bear any resemblance to my mind, now would it?!”)

The king called all the people together and announced: “I have decided to be
the greatest king alive, and to accomplish this (as I’m sure you’ll understand)
I will have to have most of you killed.”

One nervous-system-rebel concluded that prior to this, there was no this.

Before he relayed his latest story, the park philosopher said to the assembled crowd:
“I do not know whether to tell you that the following is an allegory,
is not an allegory, should be altered into an allegory,
or even a fourth possibility, which I doubt any of us are presently up to;
so it will be left to you to decide what in truth it represents (and here ’tis):
There was once a man who to himself said:
“What I want is to be able to present to the world the ideas of my mind like melodies from a precious musical instrument,” and his inner partner inquired:
“But is it a violinist you long to be, or will you settle for being a fiddle player.”
If it wasn’t for improv, the certain man would have no music – just noise –
like everyone else.

Anything carried to its actual conclusion – can’t be.

For the few: DoingTheThing is the ONLY thing.

J